Researchers of Traditional, Complementary, Alternative, & Integrative Medicine and Health

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Naturopathy Special Interest Group Research Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey

Despite recent shifts in regulation and recognition of the role that naturopathy plays in health care delivery in Canada, comparatively little research has been conducted regarding individuals who conduct naturopathy-related research. A survey was undertaken to better understand the needs and capacity of these individuals to conduct more research. Read more here.

Naturopathic Medicine for the Management of Endometriosis, Dysmenorrhea, and Menorrhagia: A Content Analysis

To explore the recommendations of naturopathic medicine for the management of endometriosis, dysmenorrhea, and menorrhagia, drawing on traditional and contemporary sources. Read more here.

Associations of Yoga Practice, Health Status, and Health Behavior among Yoga Practitioners in Germany—Results of a National Cross-Sectional Survey

While yoga can improve health-related variables and health behavior, different yoga styles and practice components appear to be associated with specific health outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the connection between yoga use, health, and health behaviors across different yoga styles. Read more here.

Effect of Alpinia officinarum Hance Rhizome Extract on Spermatogram Factors in Men with Idiopathic Infertility: A Prospective Double‐Blinded Randomised Clinical Trial

Despite scientific advances, many of the treatments in male infertility remained indeterminate. In recent years, the attention to herbal remedies as an effective treatment for male infertility is considerable. Read more here.

Herb-Drug Interactions in Cancer Care

Herbs have served as medicine throughout human history. Since the passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), inconsistent regulatory practices have resulted in widespread, indiscriminate use of herbal supplements. Available data indicate that cancer patients use these products (along with standard treatments) more often than the general population. The reasons cited for such use include improving health, reducing the risk of recurrence, and reducing the side effects of cancer treatments.

Integrative Oncology and Complementary Medicine Cancer Services in Australia: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Survey

Individuals living with and beyond a cancer diagnosis are increasingly using complementary therapies and medicines (CM) to enhance the effectiveness of cancer treatment, manage treatment-related side effects, improve quality-of-life, and promote self-efficacy. In response to the increasing use and demand for CM by cancer patients, interest in the implementation of Integrative Oncology (IO) services that provide CM alongside conventional cancer care in Australia and abroad has developed. The extent that cancer services in Australia are integrating CM is uncertain.

Acupuncture for Infantile Colic: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials

Infantile colic is a common condition causing considerable deterioration in the quality of life of both infants and their parents. Minimal acupuncture, a gentle needling technique without strong muscle stimulation, has primarily been used to treat this condition, but the clinical evidence of its efficacy and safety is yet to be established. The objective of this review was to assess clinical evidence of the safety and efficacy of acupuncture for infantile colic. Read more here.

Diet and Psychosis: A Scoping Review

Schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) represent a cluster of severe mental illnesses. Diet has been identified as a modifiable risk factor and opportunity for intervention in many physical illnesses and more recently in mental illnesses such as unipolar depression; however, no dietary guidelines exist for patients with SSD. Read more here.

Consultations with Naturopaths and Western Herbalists: Prevalence of Use and Characteristics of Users in Australia

To report the prevalence of naturopathic and Western herbal medicine service utilization in Australia, and describe the characteristics of individuals who use these services. Read more here.

Integrative Oncology and Complementary Medicine Cancer Services in Australia: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Survey

Individuals living with and beyond a cancer diagnosis are increasingly using complementary therapies and medicines (CM) to enhance the effectiveness of cancer treatment, manage treatment-related side effects, improve quality-of-life, and promote self-efficacy. In response to the increasing use and demand for CM by cancer patients, interest in the implementation of Integrative Oncology (IO) services that provide CM alongside conventional cancer care in Australia and abroad has developed. The extent that cancer services in Australia are integrating CM is uncertain.

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